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Kelly Hrudy and his daughter Kaitlin share the story of Kaitlin’s struggle with anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder, focusing on awareness and recovery

picture 581Nearly one in five Canadian children and adolescents will be touched by a mental disorder serious enough to cause social, emotional or academic problems. They will not outgrow what ails them: 70 per cent of adults with a mental illness first experienced symptoms as children or youth. Timely treatment can prevent years of struggle — but only if parents know when and how to take action on one of the most daunting challenges any family can face. [RBC White Paper: Silent Families, Suffering Children and Youth]

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The procrastination doom loop—and how to break it

August 27th, 2014 | Posted by ccsadmin in news & views - (Comments Off)

Can you imagine experiencing a long-duration mission on Mars—while here on Earth?

picture 569Ross Lockwood grew up in the small Canadian town of Winfield, British Columbia, where he developed a passion for science, engineering, and space exploration. Last week, he arrived “back on Earth” after completing a 120-day-long NASA Mars simulation mission called HI-SEAS. The HI-SEAS project  is funded by the NASA Human Research Program for four research missions of extended duration of four months to a year, in an analog of Mars missions.

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New research network will develop strategies to ensure that more young people are connected to the mental health services they need

picture 557In Canada, one-in-five people experience a mental illness in their lifetime. However, it is young Canadians that suffer the most, with 75% of mental health problems and illnesses beginning prior to the age of 25, and more than 50% beginning between the ages of 11 and 25.

An estimated 1.2 million Canadian children and youth are affected by mental illness—yet less than 20 per cent will receive appropriate treatment. With more than two-thirds of adults living with a mental health problem reporting that symptoms first appeared during their youth, establishing the foundation for healthy emotional and social development is vital to ensuring the mental well-being of all Canadians as they progress from childhood to adulthood.  [Mental Health Commission of Canada]

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Grieving in an online world

January 24th, 2013 | Posted by ccsadmin in people first radio - (Comments Off)

Online grieving, whether on Facebook or other social media, is becoming the new normal…but does it actually help?

After the campus shootings in the U.S. at Virginia Tech in 2007 and Northern Illinois University in 2008, hundreds of affected students turned to social media websites to share their grief and search for solace. A study of these students found that their online activities neither helped nor harmed their long-term psychological health.

The study gave a first-of-its-kind portrait of student reactions to shootings on their campuses. It also documented both the online and off-line activities they engaged in to memorialize and recover from these events. (more…)

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Being alone together

May 9th, 2012 | Posted by ccsadmin in currents newsletter - (Comments Off)

Social media and its implications for people with mental health issues

Social media, in the form of Facebook, Twitter, cell phones, and texting, etc. are sweeping through the world, much like a tsunami.  Thrashing about in this churning sea, many of us struggle to find our bearings.  Are we being herded around by social media, or are we in command of these new tools?  What does this mean for vulnerable people: are they being left behind, swept away into uncharted depths, or riding the wave?

Sherry Turkle, a professor at M.I.T., has described a radical change in the nature of social relationships, brought on by social media. She describes the change as a slide from full-bodied conversation to electronic connection. (more…)