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Soles remembering souls helps survivors remember, heal

November 17th, 2014 | Posted by ccsadmin in people first radio - (Comments Off)

Soles Remembering Souls ‐ Connecting Survivors will be held at the Port Theatre in Nanaimo on Sunday November 23, 2014 to support those left behind after deaths by suicide

Looking Away

Every year, many people lose their lives to suicide, leaving behind family, friends, colleagues and others who struggle to make sense of their loss. Our community is unfortunately no exception. On Vancouver Island, we lose more people to suicide than to motor vehicle accidents and accidental overdose combined. Research also tells us that someone who has lost a significant person to suicide is at a 9 times greater risk themselves.

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Research into medicinal cannabis use will examine the potential medical benefits for veterans, first responders and sexual assault survivors with PTSD

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The University of British Columbia Okanagan and Nanaimo-based Tilray, a Health Canada Licensed Producer under the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR), will conduct the country’s first clinical trial to evaluate the therapeutic benefits of medical cannabis as treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Pending regulatory approvals, the UBC-Tilray study is poised to be one of the first in the world to run a large-scale clinical trial examining medical cannabis as a treatment for a mental health disorder.

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“What had happened to our beautiful happy life? Could it really be over for us? I just wasn’t sure if our love was strong enough to keep us together. I probably believed it wasn’t.”

picture 534It was an idyllic marriage. John and Marion were high school sweethearts who married and began a successful life together. He, an internationally respected scientist in his field and she, a business woman in her family firm. With three children and finally settled in Victoria. BC, Canada after stints in Vienna and Australia, tragedy struck.

Despite the eventual and probable diagnosis of late-onset schizophrenia, John and Marion struggled to hold their family together and to deal with an illness that usually strikes much earlier in life. This is their story of what happens when the mind betrays you.

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“For people like Jessica, who don’t have employee benefits and don’t have extra money to pay for treatment, there are few options”

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When Amanda’s friend Jessica (not her real name) lost her job and spent a year desperately seeking—but not finding—another, she fell into a deep depression. “I’m in debt. I’m having a hard time paying my bills. I can’t even get a job in fast food because they tell me I’m overqualified. I just feel like I can’t come back from this. That my life is over,” she told Amanda.

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Canadian vets marching for PTSD awareness reach a goal

September 17th, 2014 | Posted by ccsadmin in people first radio - (Comments Off)

Three veterans who served Canada in the former Yugoslavia—Steve Hartwig, Jason McKenzie, and Scott McIntyre McFarlane—have marched across the country to raise awareness of PTSD

picture 584When Steve Hartwig, Jason McKenzie and Scott McFarlane arrived in Antigonish, Nova Scotia on September 7, they paused at the downtown cenotaph honouring fallen soldiers from World War I. They were close to reaching the end of their march across Canada to raise awareness of PTSD among Canada’s veterans.

In WWI, the psychological distress of soldiers was attributed to concussions caused by the impact of shells; this impact was believed to disrupt the brain and cause “shell shock” (Bentley, 2005). Now, in 2014, there is greater understanding of what is called Post Traumatic Stress Disorder—but education and awareness is still lacking.

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Kelly Hrudy and his daughter Kaitlin share the story of Kaitlin’s struggle with anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder, focusing on awareness and recovery

picture 581Nearly one in five Canadian children and adolescents will be touched by a mental disorder serious enough to cause social, emotional or academic problems. They will not outgrow what ails them: 70 per cent of adults with a mental illness first experienced symptoms as children or youth. Timely treatment can prevent years of struggle — but only if parents know when and how to take action on one of the most daunting challenges any family can face. [RBC White Paper: Silent Families, Suffering Children and Youth]

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